New Puppy FAQ's!

New Puppy FAQ's!

New Puppy FAQ’s!

Getting a new puppy is adorable, but a huge responsibility. Getting a puppy shouldn’t be a spur of the moment decision, there’s lots to learn and prepare even before you welcome your new furry family member! Here are some of the most frequently asked questions about puppies and helpful answers for you!

Which Vaccines Do They Need? – Getting your puppy vaccinated is vital for them to not only stay healthy but be able to specialise with other dogs safely too. Now, vaccines can vary from country to country but there are core vaccines that puppies should definitely get. A rabies shot is vital in some countries, and only suggested in others. Check with your vet to find out which ones your puppy needs. Here in the UK the mandatory vaccinations include:

 

  • Distemper: This can take several forms, which often makes diagnosis difficult. In general it can cause high temperature, respiratory problems (rhinitis or bronchial pneumonia), digestive problems (gastroenteritis), ocular, cutaneous or nervous problems, and may often be fatal.
  • Canine hepatitis: The symptoms range from slight fever and congestion of the mucosa membrane to vomiting, jaundice, stomach enlargement, depression, reduction of white blood cells, pain in the liver and severe hepatitis.
  • Canine parvovirus disease: Parvovirus is highly contagious and attacks the gastrointestinal system, creates loss of appetite, vomiting, fever and often severe, bloody diarrhoea. Extreme dehydration can come on rapidly and can be fatal within 48 - 72 hours.
  • Leptospirosis: Leptospirosis is a zoonotic disease which comes from bacteria transmitted by rodent urine and can be transmitted to humans and certain animals. For dogs, symptoms include fever, vomiting, abdominal pain, diarrhoea, loss of appetite, severe weakness and lethargy, stiffness, jaundice, muscle pain, infertility and kidney failure (with or without liver failure).

The recommended vaccinations include:

  • Rabies: A fatal disease for dogs and for humans. Usually characterised by a swaying gait, painful neck, excessive salivation and, in some cases, convulsions of the facial muscles. Unusually aggressive behaviour is often seen, as is biting without letting go.
  • Kennel cough: This is a disease caught by dogs in contact with other dogs, in kennels and dog shows for example. It causes severe coughing which can be more or less serious depending on the age and the general health condition of the dog.

What to Expect at the Vet – When you get a new puppy, you should make an initial appointment at the vet. This initial exam is very important not for their health, but to get your puppy used to going to see the vet on a regular basis.

First, the veterinarian or veterinary technician will take your puppy’s vitals and ask for his health history. The veterinarian will examine your puppy from nose to tail to check for signs of disease, abnormalities and external parasites.

 Depending on your puppy’s age and vaccination history, the veterinarian will administer the proper vaccinations. They may also give deworming medication, suggest a flea, and tick preventive. This first exam is a great time to bring up the other questions and any concerns you want your vet to address.

The Dog Park? Dog parks are very popular in the US but becoming more and more popular in the UK and Europe as well! In the 3 months of your puppies life, you should try to introduce them to as many people and other dogs as you can, but this needs to be done at the right time and as safety as possible.

 Dog park are a great place to meet other dog/puppy owners and for your pup to socialise and make new friends! But when can you take your new puppy to the nearest dog park? If he hasn’t gotten the proper vaccines yet, it’s not a good idea to take him to public places like the doggy park, where he could contract a deadly disease like parvo. The dogs at the dog park could be ill or unvaccinated. It’s not worth the risk; wait until your vet gives the all-clear.

When to Start Training? - If you want your precious little puppy to grow up to be a well-behaved companion, you need to teach him or her some manners, and some basic obedience commands.

The great news is that when it comes to training your puppy, there is no real need to wait. You can start training your puppy as soon as you bring them home. In many cases, training your puppy early on is much better than trying when they’ve matured.

The basics are the best place to start; sit, stay, drop and telling you when they need to use the outside facilities. That’s a lot! But you don’t need to do it all at once. Keep training sessions short and fun. Make sure to practice reward-based, positive reinforcement training techniques.

After they’ve mastered the basics, you can carry on and teach them also sorts of commands and tricks! Do the laundry? Maybe not…

When to Spay & Neuter Puppies -  Now this is both an important point but also a very dividing one. You need only to look in the comment sections of some Puppy Facebook groups to see how nasty people can get with this topic. But here at Relax My Dog, we urge spaying and neutering your pups to save them from pain, discomfort and distress when they get to sexual maturity.

Spaying and neutering your pup should occur at about the 5-6 month old mark, before they go into their first heat cycle (for females), to prevent unwanted offspring.

In some cases, larger breeds may benefit from a longer wait. Talk to your veterinarian about the best time to spay or neuter your puppy. There are many myths surrounding spaying and neutering, so it’s important to read up on all the facts. We’ve got a Blog and Podcast episode discussing these, to help you!

Which Vaccines Do They Need? – Getting your puppy vaccinated is vital for them to not only stay healthy but be able to specialise with other dogs safely too. Now, vaccines can vary from country to country but there are core vaccines that puppies should definitely get. A rabies shot is vital in some countries, and only suggested in others. Check with your vet to find out which ones your puppy needs. Here in the UK the mandatory vaccinations include:

  • Distemper: This can take several forms, which often makes diagnosis difficult. In general it can cause high temperature, respiratory problems (rhinitis or bronchial pneumonia), digestive problems (gastroenteritis), ocular, cutaneous or nervous problems, and may often be fatal.
  • Canine hepatitis: The symptoms range from slight fever and congestion of the mucosa membrane to vomiting, jaundice, stomach enlargement, depression, reduction of white blood cells, pain in the liver and severe hepatitis.
  • Canine parvovirus disease: Parvovirus is highly contagious and attacks the gastrointestinal system, creates loss of appetite, vomiting, fever and often severe, bloody diarrhoea. Extreme dehydration can come on rapidly and can be fatal within 48 - 72 hours.
  • Leptospirosis: Leptospirosis is a zoonotic disease which comes from bacteria transmitted by rodent urine and can be transmitted to humans and certain animals. For dogs, symptoms include fever, vomiting, abdominal pain, diarrhoea, loss of appetite, severe weakness and lethargy, stiffness, jaundice, muscle pain, infertility and kidney failure (with or without liver failure).

The recommended vaccinations include:

  • Rabies: A fatal disease for dogs and for humans. Usually characterised by a swaying gait, painful neck, excessive salivation and, in some cases, convulsions of the facial muscles. Unusually aggressive behaviour is often seen, as is biting without letting go.
  • Kennel cough: This is a disease caught by dogs in contact with other dogs, in kennels and dog shows for example. It causes severe coughing which can be more or less serious depending on the age and the general health condition of the dog.

What to Expect at the Vet – When you get a new puppy, you should make an initial appointment at the vet. This initial exam is very important not for their health, but to get your puppy used to going to see the vet on a regular basis.

First, the veterinarian or veterinary technician will take your puppy’s vitals and ask for his health history. The veterinarian will examine your puppy from nose to tail to check for signs of disease, abnormalities and external parasites.

 Depending on your puppy’s age and vaccination history, the veterinarian will administer the proper vaccinations. They may also give deworming medication, suggest a flea, and tick preventive. This first exam is a great time to bring up the other questions and any concerns you want your vet to address.

The Dog Park? Dog parks are very popular in the US but becoming more and more popular in the UK and Europe as well! In the 3 months of your puppies life, you should try to introduce them to as many people and other dogs as you can, but this needs to be done at the right time and as safety as possible.

 Dog park are a great place to meet other dog/puppy owners and for your pup to socialise and make new friends! But when can you take your new puppy to the nearest dog park? If he hasn’t gotten the proper vaccines yet, it’s not a good idea to take him to public places like the doggy park, where he could contract a deadly disease like parvo. The dogs at the dog park could be ill or unvaccinated. It’s not worth the risk; wait until your vet gives the all-clear.

When to Start Training? - If you want your precious little puppy to grow up to be a well-behaved companion, you need to teach him or her some manners, and some basic obedience commands.

The great news is that when it comes to training your puppy, there is no real need to wait. You can start training your puppy as soon as you bring them home. In many cases, training your puppy early on is much better than trying when they’ve matured.

The basics are the best place to start; sit, stay, drop and telling you when they need to use the outside facilities. That’s a lot! But you don’t need to do it all at once. Keep training sessions short and fun. Make sure to practice reward-based, positive reinforcement training techniques.

After they’ve mastered the basics, you can carry on and teach them also sorts of commands and tricks! Do the laundry? Maybe not…

When to Spay & Neuter Puppies -  Now this is both an important point but also a very dividing one. You need only to look in the comment sections of some Puppy Facebook groups to see how nasty people can get with this topic. But here at Relax My Dog, we urge spaying and neutering your pups to save them from pain, discomfort and distress when they get to sexual maturity.

Spaying and neutering your pup should occur at about the 5-6 month old mark, before they go into their first heat cycle (for females), to prevent unwanted offspring.

In some cases, larger breeds may benefit from a longer wait. Talk to your veterinarian about the best time to spay or neuter your puppy. There are many myths surrounding spaying and neutering, so it’s important to read up on all the facts. We’ve got a Blog and Podcast episode discussing these, to help you!

Sep 17 2021
by Claire